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Landing the Job

So you know which companies are the best places to work. Now, give yourself the best shot at landing a position there

Whether you are a recent college graduate or someone venturing down a new career path, one thing remains constant: Great companies seek out the best employees.

The search starts with a solid résumé, which is supplemented by a strong interview.

Brad Karsh is the president and founder of JobBound, a company dedicated to helping recent college graduates transition into the working world. He is considered an industry expert on breaking into the job market after spending 15 years at advertising agency Leo Burnett USA, where he was the vice president and director of talent acquisition. In his time there, Karsh critiqued more than 10,000 résumés and interviewed more than 1,000 entry-level job candidates. Here are some tips that Karsh offers as ways to help prospective employees make the cut.

Résumé tips

A résumé is like an advertisement; it needs to convey a compelling message to the target audience.
Dates are not as important as relevant experience; don’t think that everything needs to be in chronological order.
Specific examples that show positive qualities go much further than self-ascribed attributes that the majority of other candidates will put down as well.
Focus on how hiring you will benefit the company. Show that your experience and accomplishments make you the best match for the job.
Avoid common résumé “pet peeves” such as: microscopic font sizes; errors in spelling, grammar or diction; and invalid or unproven accolades or experiences.

Interview tips

You never get a second chance to make a first impression. Preparation will go a long way in strengthening your case.
The best interviews are those that are conversational, they shouldn’t be interrogations.
Know what the employer is looking for in the position, and do enough background research to be familiar with the company.
Be prepared for open-ended questions and answer honestly.
Always ask questions! It shows that you are interested in the job and the company.

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