Let’s Get Physical

October, 2006

It’s not news to report that our lives are more sedentary than ever before. The national numbers on obesity and rising health care costs are alarming, even if they are not surprising anymore. With that in mind, we focused on some of the many exercises you can do to lead a healthier lifestyle and prevent illness.

Or at the very least, shed some pounds.

For perspective, the President’s Council on Physical Fitness reports that if you walk for just 15 minutes (about a mile) you will burn 100 calories. That’s 700 calories a week if you made that walk every day. If you kept the same food intake levels and did it for a year, you could lose up to 10 pounds of fat.

So size up some of your favorite activities and figure out how much you can lose by adding to your regular weekly schedule.

Because what goes in, must be burned off.

Calorie burn is calculated for a person weighing 150 pounds doing the activity for one hour.

 

HEALTH SCREENING

 

MEN

Heart disease screening Blood pressure check every two years starting at age of 18. Cholesterol test every five years from ages 35 to 65.

Colorectal cancer screening Fecal occult blood test (FOBT) or stool blood test annually and/or sigmoidoscopy every five years at age 50 and above.

Diabetes Screening Plasma glucose test every three years at age 45 and above.

Prostate Screening Discuss with your doctor starting at the age of 40

 

WOMEN

Heart disease screening Blood pressure check at each office visit or every two years at age 18 and above. Cholesterol test every five years for ages 45-65.

Colorectal cancer screening Fecal occult blood test (FOBT) or stool blood test annually and/or sigmoidoscopy every five years at age 50 and above.

Cervical cancer screening Pap smear every three years for ages 21-65 or within three years of onset of sexual activity (whichever comes first).

Breast cancer screening Mammogram every one to two years for ages 40 and above.

Diabetes screening Plasma glucose test every three years at age 45 and above.

Osteoporosis screening Regular screening starting at age 65; from age 60, if at increased risk.

source: HMSA and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

 

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Author:

Scott Radway